vice

[[t]va͟ɪs[/t]]
♦♦♦
vices
1) N-COUNT A vice is a habit which is regarded as a weakness in someone's character, but not usually as a serious fault.

His only vice is to get drunk on champagne after concluding a successful piece of business...

Intellectual pretension was never one of his vices.

2) N-UNCOUNT Vice refers to criminal activities, especially those connected with pornography or prostitution.

He said those responsible for offences connected with vice, gaming and drugs should be deported on conviction.

...allegations of how she worked in a `seedy vice den'.

3) N-COUNT A vice is a tool with a pair of parts that hold an object tightly while you do work on it. [BRIT]
(in AM, use vise)

English dictionary. 2008.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Vice — is a practice or habit that is considered immoral, depraved, and/or degrading in the associated society. In more minor usage, vice can refer to a fault, a defect, an infirmity, or merely a bad habit. Synonyms for vice include fault, depravity,… …   Wikipedia

  • Vice — Vice, a. [Cf. F. vice . See {Vice}, prep.] Denoting one who in certain cases may assume the office or duties of a superior; designating an officer or an office that is second in rank or authority; as, vice president; vice agent; vice consul, etc …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Vice — Vice, n. [F., from L. vitium.] 1. A defect; a fault; an error; a blemish; an imperfection; as, the vices of a political constitution; the vices of a horse. [1913 Webster] Withouten vice of syllable or letter. Chaucer. [1913 Webster] Mark the vice …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Vice — Vice, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Viced}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Vicing}.] To hold or squeeze with a vice, or as if with a vice. Shak. [1913 Webster] The coachman s hand was viced between his upper and lower thigh. De Quincey. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Vice — Vice, n. [See {Vise}.] 1. (Mech.) A kind of instrument for holding work, as in filing. Same as {Vise}. [1913 Webster] 2. A tool for drawing lead into cames, or flat grooved rods, for casements. [Written also {vise}.] [1913 Webster] 3. A gripe or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Vice — Vi ce, prep. [L., abl. of vicis change, turn. See {Vicarious}.] In the place of; in the stead; as, A. B. was appointed postmaster vice C. D. resigned. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • VICE — s. m. Défaut, imperfection. Vice de nature. Vice de conformation. Vice de construction. Cette maladie vient d un vice du sang. Ce cheval n a point de vices. Vice rédhibitoire. Il y a un vice considérable dans cet acte. Vice de forme. Vice de… …   Dictionnaire de l'Academie Francaise, 7eme edition (1835)

  • VICE — n. m. Défaut, imperfection grave qui rend une personne ou une chose plus ou moins impropre à sa destination. Vice de nature. Vice de conformation. Vice rédhibitoire. Ce cheval n’a point de vices. Il y a un vice dans cet acte. Vice de forme. Vice… …   Dictionnaire de l'Academie Francaise, 8eme edition (1935)

  • VICE — Infobox Software name = VICE caption = VICE emulating Commodore 64 collapsible = author = developer = VICE team released = latest release version = 2.0 latest release date = Release date and age|2008|7|25 latest preview version = latest preview… …   Wikipedia

  • vice- — prefix Etymology: Middle English vis , vice , from Anglo French, from Late Latin vice , from Latin vice, ablative of vicis one that takes the place of < vice chancellor > …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • vice — I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo French, from Latin vitium fault, vice Date: 14th century 1. a. moral depravity or corruption ; wickedness b. a moral fault or failing c. a habitual and usually trivial defect or shortcoming ; foible …   New Collegiate Dictionary


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.